Python and pip, list all versions of a package that's available?

Question:

Given the name of a Python package that can be installed with pip, is there any way to find out a list of all the possible versions of it that pip could install? Right now it’s trial and error.

I’m trying to install a version for a third party library, but the newest version is too new, there were backwards incompatible changes made. So I’d like to somehow have a list of all the versions that pip knows about, so that I can test them.

Asked By: Amandasaurus

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Answers:

After looking at pip’s code for a while, it looks like the code responsible for locating packages can be found in the PackageFinder class in pip.index. Its method find_requirement looks up the versions of a InstallRequirement, but unfortunately only returns the most recent version.

The code below is almost a 1:1 copy of the original function, with the return in line 114 changed to return all versions.

The script expects one package name as first and only argument and returns all versions.

http://pastebin.com/axzdUQhZ

I can’t guarantee for the correctness, as I’m not familiar with pip’s code. But hopefully this helps.

Sample output

python test.py pip
Versions of pip
0.8.2
0.8.1
0.8
0.7.2
0.7.1
0.7
0.6.3
0.6.2
0.6.1
0.6
0.5.1
0.5
0.4
0.3.1
0.3
0.2.1
0.2 dev

The code:

import posixpath
import pkg_resources
import sys
from pip.download import url_to_path
from pip.exceptions import DistributionNotFound
from pip.index import PackageFinder, Link
from pip.log import logger
from pip.req import InstallRequirement
from pip.util import Inf


class MyPackageFinder(PackageFinder):

    def find_requirement(self, req, upgrade):
        url_name = req.url_name
        # Only check main index if index URL is given:
        main_index_url = None
        if self.index_urls:
            # Check that we have the url_name correctly spelled:
            main_index_url = Link(posixpath.join(self.index_urls[0], url_name))
            # This will also cache the page, so it's okay that we get it again later:
            page = self._get_page(main_index_url, req)
            if page is None:
                url_name = self._find_url_name(Link(self.index_urls[0]), url_name, req) or req.url_name

        # Combine index URLs with mirror URLs here to allow
        # adding more index URLs from requirements files
        all_index_urls = self.index_urls + self.mirror_urls

        def mkurl_pypi_url(url):
            loc = posixpath.join(url, url_name)
            # For maximum compatibility with easy_install, ensure the path
            # ends in a trailing slash.  Although this isn't in the spec
            # (and PyPI can handle it without the slash) some other index
            # implementations might break if they relied on easy_install's behavior.
            if not loc.endswith('/'):
                loc = loc + '/'
            return loc
        if url_name is not None:
            locations = [
                mkurl_pypi_url(url)
                for url in all_index_urls] + self.find_links
        else:
            locations = list(self.find_links)
        locations.extend(self.dependency_links)
        for version in req.absolute_versions:
            if url_name is not None and main_index_url is not None:
                locations = [
                    posixpath.join(main_index_url.url, version)] + locations

        file_locations, url_locations = self._sort_locations(locations)

        locations = [Link(url) for url in url_locations]
        logger.debug('URLs to search for versions for %s:' % req)
        for location in locations:
            logger.debug('* %s' % location)
        found_versions = []
        found_versions.extend(
            self._package_versions(
                [Link(url, '-f') for url in self.find_links], req.name.lower()))
        page_versions = []
        for page in self._get_pages(locations, req):
            logger.debug('Analyzing links from page %s' % page.url)
            logger.indent += 2
            try:
                page_versions.extend(self._package_versions(page.links, req.name.lower()))
            finally:
                logger.indent -= 2
        dependency_versions = list(self._package_versions(
            [Link(url) for url in self.dependency_links], req.name.lower()))
        if dependency_versions:
            logger.info('dependency_links found: %s' % ', '.join([link.url for parsed, link, version in dependency_versions]))
        file_versions = list(self._package_versions(
                [Link(url) for url in file_locations], req.name.lower()))
        if not found_versions and not page_versions and not dependency_versions and not file_versions:
            logger.fatal('Could not find any downloads that satisfy the requirement %s' % req)
            raise DistributionNotFound('No distributions at all found for %s' % req)
        if req.satisfied_by is not None:
            found_versions.append((req.satisfied_by.parsed_version, Inf, req.satisfied_by.version))
        if file_versions:
            file_versions.sort(reverse=True)
            logger.info('Local files found: %s' % ', '.join([url_to_path(link.url) for parsed, link, version in file_versions]))
            found_versions = file_versions + found_versions
        all_versions = found_versions + page_versions + dependency_versions
        applicable_versions = []
        for (parsed_version, link, version) in all_versions:
            if version not in req.req:
                logger.info("Ignoring link %s, version %s doesn't match %s"
                            % (link, version, ','.join([''.join(s) for s in req.req.specs])))
                continue
            applicable_versions.append((link, version))
        applicable_versions = sorted(applicable_versions, key=lambda v: pkg_resources.parse_version(v[1]), reverse=True)
        existing_applicable = bool([link for link, version in applicable_versions if link is Inf])
        if not upgrade and existing_applicable:
            if applicable_versions[0][1] is Inf:
                logger.info('Existing installed version (%s) is most up-to-date and satisfies requirement'
                            % req.satisfied_by.version)
            else:
                logger.info('Existing installed version (%s) satisfies requirement (most up-to-date version is %s)'
                            % (req.satisfied_by.version, applicable_versions[0][1]))
            return None
        if not applicable_versions:
            logger.fatal('Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement %s (from versions: %s)'
                         % (req, ', '.join([version for parsed_version, link, version in found_versions])))
            raise DistributionNotFound('No distributions matching the version for %s' % req)
        if applicable_versions[0][0] is Inf:
            # We have an existing version, and its the best version
            logger.info('Installed version (%s) is most up-to-date (past versions: %s)'
                        % (req.satisfied_by.version, ', '.join([version for link, version in applicable_versions[1:]]) or 'none'))
            return None
        if len(applicable_versions) > 1:
            logger.info('Using version %s (newest of versions: %s)' %
                        (applicable_versions[0][1], ', '.join([version for link, version in applicable_versions])))
        return applicable_versions


if __name__ == '__main__':
    req = InstallRequirement.from_line(sys.argv[1], None)
    finder = MyPackageFinder([], ['http://pypi.python.org/simple/'])
    versions = finder.find_requirement(req, False)
    print 'Versions of %s' % sys.argv[1]
    for v in versions:
        print v[1]
Answered By: Reiner Gerecke

(update: As of March 2020, many people have reported that yolk, installed via pip install yolk3k, only returns latest version. Chris’s answer seems to have the most upvotes and worked for me)

The script at pastebin does work. However it’s not very convenient if you’re working with multiple environments/hosts because you will have to copy/create it every time.

A better all-around solution would be to use yolk3k, which is available to install with pip. E.g. to see what versions of Django are available:

$ pip install yolk3k
$ yolk -V django
Django 1.3
Django 1.2.5
Django 1.2.4
Django 1.2.3
Django 1.2.2
Django 1.2.1
Django 1.2
Django 1.1.4
Django 1.1.3
Django 1.1.2
Django 1.0.4

yolk3k is a fork of the original yolk which ceased development in 2012. Though yolk is no longer maintained (as indicated in comments below), yolk3k appears to be and supports Python 3.

Note: I am not involved in the development of yolk3k. If something doesn’t seem to work as it should, leaving a comment here should not make much difference. Use the yolk3k issue tracker instead and consider submitting a fix, if possible.

Answered By: m000

https://pypi.python.org/pypi/Django/ – works for packages whose maintainers choose to show all packages
https://pypi.python.org/simple/pip/ – should do the trick anyhow (lists all links)

Answered By: m0she

Update:
As of Sep 2017 this method no longer works: --no-install was removed in pip 7

Use pip install -v, you can see all versions that available

[email protected]:~# pip install web.py -v
Downloading/unpacking web.py
  Using version 0.37 (newest of versions: 0.37, 0.36, 0.35, 0.34, 0.33, 0.33, 0.32, 0.31, 0.22, 0.2)
  Downloading web.py-0.37.tar.gz (90Kb): 90Kb downloaded
  Running setup.py egg_info for package web.py
    running egg_info
    creating pip-egg-info/web.py.egg-info

To not install any package, use one of following solution:

[email protected]:~# pip install --no-deps --no-install flask -v                                                                                                      
Downloading/unpacking flask
  Using version 0.10.1 (newest of versions: 0.10.1, 0.10, 0.9, 0.8.1, 0.8, 0.7.2, 0.7.1, 0.7, 0.6.1, 0.6, 0.5.2, 0.5.1, 0.5, 0.4, 0.3.1, 0.3, 0.2, 0.1)
  Downloading Flask-0.10.1.tar.gz (544Kb): 544Kb downloaded

or

[email protected]:~# cd $(mktemp -d)
[email protected]:/tmp/tmp.c6H99cWD0g# pip install flask -d . -v
Downloading/unpacking flask
  Using version 0.10.1 (newest of versions: 0.10.1, 0.10, 0.9, 0.8.1, 0.8, 0.7.2, 0.7.1, 0.7, 0.6.1, 0.6, 0.5.2, 0.5.1, 0.5, 0.4, 0.3.1, 0.3, 0.2, 0.1)
  Downloading Flask-0.10.1.tar.gz (544Kb): 4.1Kb downloaded

Tested with pip 1.0

[email protected]:~# pip --version
pip 1.0 from /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages (python 2.7)
Answered By: HVNSweeting

You could the yolk3k package instead of yolk. yolk3k is a fork from the original yolk and it supports both python2 and 3.

https://github.com/myint/yolk

pip install yolk3k
Answered By: ykyuen

For pip >= 21.2 use:

pip index versions pylibmc

Note that this command is experimental, and might change in the future!

For pip >= 21.1 use:

pip install pylibmc==

For pip >= 20.3 use:

pip install --use-deprecated=legacy-resolver pylibmc==

For pip >= 9.0 use:

$ pip install pylibmc==
Collecting pylibmc==
  Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement pylibmc== (from 
  versions: 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5.1, 0.5.2, 0.5.3, 0.5.4, 0.5.5, 0.5, 0.6.1, 0.6, 
  0.7.1, 0.7.2, 0.7.3, 0.7.4, 0.7, 0.8.1, 0.8.2, 0.8, 0.9.1, 0.9.2, 0.9, 
  1.0-alpha, 1.0-beta, 1.0, 1.1.1, 1.1, 1.2.0, 1.2.1, 1.2.2, 1.2.3, 1.3.0)
No matching distribution found for pylibmc==

The available versions will be printed without actually downloading or installing any packages.

For pip < 9.0 use:

pip install pylibmc==blork

where blork can be any string that is not a valid version number.

Answered By: Chris Montanaro

You don’t need a third party package to get this information. pypi provides simple JSON feeds for all packages under

https://pypi.org/pypi/{PKG_NAME}/json

Here’s some Python code using only the standard library which gets all versions.

import json
import urllib2
from distutils.version import StrictVersion

def versions(package_name):
    url = "https://pypi.org/pypi/%s/json" % (package_name,)
    data = json.load(urllib2.urlopen(urllib2.Request(url)))
    versions = data["releases"].keys()
    versions.sort(key=StrictVersion)
    return versions

print "n".join(versions("scikit-image"))

That code prints (as of Feb 23rd, 2015):

0.7.2
0.8.0
0.8.1
0.8.2
0.9.0
0.9.1
0.9.2
0.9.3
0.10.0
0.10.1
Answered By: eric chiang

I didn’t have any luck with yolk, yolk3k or pip install -v but so I ended up using this (adapted to Python 3 from eric chiang’s answer):

import json
import requests
from distutils.version import StrictVersion

def versions(package_name):
    url = "https://pypi.python.org/pypi/{}/json".format(package_name)
    data = requests.get(url).json()
    return sorted(list(data["releases"].keys()), key=StrictVersion, reverse=True)

>>> print("n".join(versions("gunicorn")))
19.1.1
19.1.0
19.0.0
18.0
17.5
0.17.4
0.17.3
...
Answered By: Andrew Magee

I came up with dead-simple bash script. Thanks to jq‘s author.

#!/bin/bash
set -e

PACKAGE_JSON_URL="https://pypi.org/pypi/${1}/json"

curl -L -s "$PACKAGE_JSON_URL" | jq  -r '.releases | keys | .[]' | sort -V

Update:

  • Add sorting by version number.
  • Add -L to follow redirects.
Answered By: Timofey Stolbov

You can use this small Python 3 script (using only standard library modules) to grab the list of available versions for a package from PyPI using JSON API and print them in reverse chronological order. Unlike some other Python solutions posted here, this doesn’t break on loose versions like django‘s 2.2rc1 or uwsgi‘s 2.0.17.1:

#!/usr/bin/env python3

import json
import sys
from urllib import request    
from pkg_resources import parse_version    

def versions(pkg_name):
    url = f'https://pypi.python.org/pypi/{pkg_name}/json'
    releases = json.loads(request.urlopen(url).read())['releases']
    return sorted(releases, key=parse_version, reverse=True)    

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print(*versions(sys.argv[1]), sep='n')

Save the script and run it with the package name as an argument, e.g.:

python versions.py django
3.0a1
2.2.5
2.2.4
2.2.3
2.2.2
2.2.1
2.2
2.2rc1
...
Answered By: Eugene Yarmash

This works for me on OSX:

pip install docker-compose== 2>&1 
| grep -oE '((.*))' 
| awk -F:  '{print$NF}' 
| sed -E 's/( |))//g' 
| tr ',' 'n'

It returns the list one per line:

1.1.0rc1
1.1.0rc2
1.1.0
1.2.0rc1
1.2.0rc2
1.2.0rc3
1.2.0rc4
1.2.0
1.3.0rc1
1.3.0rc2
1.3.0rc3
1.3.0
1.3.1
1.3.2
1.3.3
1.4.0rc1
1.4.0rc2
1.4.0rc3
1.4.0
1.4.1
1.4.2
1.5.0rc1
1.5.0rc2
1.5.0rc3
1.5.0
1.5.1
1.5.2
1.6.0rc1
1.6.0
1.6.1
1.6.2
1.7.0rc1
1.7.0rc2
1.7.0
1.7.1
1.8.0rc1
1.8.0rc2
1.8.0
1.8.1
1.9.0rc1
1.9.0rc2
1.9.0rc3
1.9.0rc4
1.9.0
1.10.0rc1
1.10.0rc2
1.10.0

Or to get the latest version available:

pip install docker-compose== 2>&1 
| grep -oE '((.*))' 
| awk -F:  '{print$NF}' 
| sed -E 's/( |))//g' 
| tr ',' 'n' 
| gsort -r -V 
| head -1
1.10.0rc2

Keep in mind gsort has to be installed (on OSX) to parse the versions. You can install it with brew install coreutils

Answered By: grandma

My take is a combination of a couple of posted answers, with some modifications to make them easier to use from within a running python environment.

The idea is to provide a entirely new command (modeled after the install command) that gives you an instance of the package finder to use. The upside is that it works with, and uses, any indexes that pip supports and reads your local pip configuration files, so you get the correct results as you would with a normal pip install.

I’ve made an attempt at making it compatible with both pip v 9.x and 10.x.. but only tried it on 9.x

https://gist.github.com/kaos/68511bd013fcdebe766c981f50b473d4

#!/usr/bin/env python
# When you want a easy way to get at all (or the latest) version of a certain python package from a PyPi index.

import sys
import logging

try:
    from pip._internal import cmdoptions, main
    from pip._internal.commands import commands_dict
    from pip._internal.basecommand import RequirementCommand
except ImportError:
    from pip import cmdoptions, main
    from pip.commands import commands_dict
    from pip.basecommand import RequirementCommand

from pip._vendor.packaging.version import parse as parse_version

logger = logging.getLogger('pip')

class ListPkgVersionsCommand(RequirementCommand):
    """
    List all available versions for a given package from:

    - PyPI (and other indexes) using requirement specifiers.
    - VCS project urls.
    - Local project directories.
    - Local or remote source archives.

    """
    name = "list-pkg-versions"
    usage = """
      %prog [options] <requirement specifier> [package-index-options] ...
      %prog [options] [-e] <vcs project url> ...
      %prog [options] [-e] <local project path> ...
      %prog [options] <archive url/path> ..."""

    summary = 'List package versions.'

    def __init__(self, *args, **kw):
        super(ListPkgVersionsCommand, self).__init__(*args, **kw)

        cmd_opts = self.cmd_opts

        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.install_options())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.global_options())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.use_wheel())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.no_use_wheel())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.no_binary())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.only_binary())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.pre())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.require_hashes())

        index_opts = cmdoptions.make_option_group(
            cmdoptions.index_group,
            self.parser,
        )

        self.parser.insert_option_group(0, index_opts)
        self.parser.insert_option_group(0, cmd_opts)

    def run(self, options, args):
        cmdoptions.resolve_wheel_no_use_binary(options)
        cmdoptions.check_install_build_global(options)

        with self._build_session(options) as session:
            finder = self._build_package_finder(options, session)

            # do what you please with the finder object here... ;)
            for pkg in args:
                logger.info(
                    '%s: %s', pkg,
                    ', '.join(
                        sorted(
                            set(str(c.version) for c in finder.find_all_candidates(pkg)),
                            key=parse_version,
                        )
                    )
                )


commands_dict[ListPkgVersionsCommand.name] = ListPkgVersionsCommand

if __name__ == '__main__':
    sys.exit(main())

Example output

./list-pkg-versions.py list-pkg-versions pika django
pika: 0.5, 0.5.1, 0.5.2, 0.9.1a0, 0.9.2a0, 0.9.3, 0.9.4, 0.9.5, 0.9.6, 0.9.7, 0.9.8, 0.9.9, 0.9.10, 0.9.11, 0.9.12, 0.9.13, 0.9.14, 0.10.0b1, 0.10.0b2, 0.10.0, 0.11.0b1, 0.11.0, 0.11.1, 0.11.2, 0.12.0b2
django: 1.1.3, 1.1.4, 1.2, 1.2.1, 1.2.2, 1.2.3, 1.2.4, 1.2.5, 1.2.6, 1.2.7, 1.3, 1.3.1, 1.3.2, 1.3.3, 1.3.4, 1.3.5, 1.3.6, 1.3.7, 1.4, 1.4.1, 1.4.2, 1.4.3, 1.4.4, 1.4.5, 1.4.6, 1.4.7, 1.4.8, 1.4.9, 1.4.10, 1.4.11, 1.4.12, 1.4.13, 1.4.14, 1.4.15, 1.4.16, 1.4.17, 1.4.18, 1.4.19, 1.4.20, 1.4.21, 1.4.22, 1.5, 1.5.1, 1.5.2, 1.5.3, 1.5.4, 1.5.5, 1.5.6, 1.5.7, 1.5.8, 1.5.9, 1.5.10, 1.5.11, 1.5.12, 1.6, 1.6.1, 1.6.2, 1.6.3, 1.6.4, 1.6.5, 1.6.6, 1.6.7, 1.6.8, 1.6.9, 1.6.10, 1.6.11, 1.7, 1.7.1, 1.7.2, 1.7.3, 1.7.4, 1.7.5, 1.7.6, 1.7.7, 1.7.8, 1.7.9, 1.7.10, 1.7.11, 1.8a1, 1.8b1, 1.8b2, 1.8rc1, 1.8, 1.8.1, 1.8.2, 1.8.3, 1.8.4, 1.8.5, 1.8.6, 1.8.7, 1.8.8, 1.8.9, 1.8.10, 1.8.11, 1.8.12, 1.8.13, 1.8.14, 1.8.15, 1.8.16, 1.8.17, 1.8.18, 1.8.19, 1.9a1, 1.9b1, 1.9rc1, 1.9rc2, 1.9, 1.9.1, 1.9.2, 1.9.3, 1.9.4, 1.9.5, 1.9.6, 1.9.7, 1.9.8, 1.9.9, 1.9.10, 1.9.11, 1.9.12, 1.9.13, 1.10a1, 1.10b1, 1.10rc1, 1.10, 1.10.1, 1.10.2, 1.10.3, 1.10.4, 1.10.5, 1.10.6, 1.10.7, 1.10.8, 1.11a1, 1.11b1, 1.11rc1, 1.11, 1.11.1, 1.11.2, 1.11.3, 1.11.4, 1.11.5, 1.11.6, 1.11.7, 1.11.8, 1.11.9, 1.11.10, 1.11.11, 1.11.12, 2.0, 2.0.1, 2.0.2, 2.0.3, 2.0.4
Answered By: Kaos

Alternative solution is to use the Warehouse APIs:

https://warehouse.readthedocs.io/api-reference/json/#release

For instance for Flask:

import requests
r = requests.get("https://pypi.org/pypi/Flask/json")
print(r.json()['releases'].keys())

will print:

dict_keys(['0.1', '0.10', '0.10.1', '0.11', '0.11.1', '0.12', '0.12.1', '0.12.2', '0.12.3', '0.12.4', '0.2', '0.3', '0.3.1', '0.4', '0.5', '0.5.1', '0.5.2', '0.6', '0.6.1', '0.7', '0.7.1', '0.7.2', '0.8', '0.8.1', '0.9', '1.0', '1.0.1', '1.0.2'])
Answered By: Charlie

My project luddite has this feature.

Example usage:

>>> import luddite
>>> luddite.get_versions_pypi("python-dateutil")
('0.1', '0.3', '0.4', '0.5', '1.0', '1.1', '1.2', '1.4', '1.4.1', '1.5', '2.0', '2.1', '2.2', '2.3', '2.4.0', '2.4.1', '2.4.2', '2.5.0', '2.5.1', '2.5.2', '2.5.3', '2.6.0', '2.6.1', '2.7.0', '2.7.1', '2.7.2', '2.7.3', '2.7.4', '2.7.5', '2.8.0')

It lists all versions of a package available, by querying the JSON API of https://pypi.org/

Answered By: wim

Simple bash script that relies only on python itself (I assume that in the context of the question it should be installed) and one of curl or wget. It has an assumption that you have setuptools package installed to sort versions (almost always installed). It doesn’t rely on external dependencies such as:

  • jq which may not be present;
  • grep and awk that may behave differently on Linux and macOS.
curl --silent --location https://pypi.org/pypi/requests/json | python -c "import sys, json, pkg_resources; releases = json.load(sys.stdin)['releases']; print(' '.join(sorted(releases, key=pkg_resources.parse_version)))"

A little bit longer version with comments.

Put the package name into a variable:

PACKAGE=requests

Get versions (using curl):

VERSIONS=$(curl --silent --location https://pypi.org/pypi/$PACKAGE/json | python -c "import sys, json, pkg_resources; releases = json.load(sys.stdin)['releases']; print(' '.join(sorted(releases, key=pkg_resources.parse_version)))")

Get versions (using wget):

VERSIONS=$(wget -qO- https://pypi.org/pypi/$PACKAGE/json | python -c "import sys, json, pkg_resources; releases = json.load(sys.stdin)['releases']; print(' '.join(sorted(releases, key=pkg_resources.parse_version)))")

Print sorted versions:

echo $VERSIONS
Answered By: Andrey Semakin

You can try to install package version that does to exist. Then pip will list available versions

pip install hell==99999
ERROR: Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement hell==99999
(from versions: 0.1.0, 0.2.0, 0.2.1, 0.2.2, 0.2.3, 0.2.4, 0.3.0,
0.3.1, 0.3.2, 0.3.3, 0.3.4, 0.4.0, 0.4.1)
ERROR: No matching distribution found for hell==99999

Here’s my answer that sorts the list inside jq (for those who use systems where sort -V is not avalable) :

$ pythonPackage=certifi
$ curl -Ls https://pypi.org/pypi/$pythonPackage/json | jq -r '.releases | keys_unsorted | sort_by( split(".") | map(tonumber) )'
  ............. 
  "2019.3.9",
  "2019.6.16",
  "2019.9.11",
  "2019.11.28",
  "2020.4.5",
  "2020.4.5.1",
  "2020.4.5.2",
  "2020.6.20",
  "2020.11.8"
]

And to fetch the last version number of the package :

$ curl -Ls https://pypi.org/pypi/$pythonPackage/json | jq -r '.releases | keys_unsorted | sort_by( split(".") | map(tonumber) )[-1]'
2020.11.8

or a bit faster :

$ curl -Ls https://pypi.org/pypi/$pythonPackage/json | jq -r '.releases | keys_unsorted | max_by( split(".") | map(tonumber) )'
2020.11.8

Or even more simple 🙂 :

$ curl -Ls https://pypi.org/pypi/$pythonPackage/json | jq -r .info.version
2020.11.8
Answered By: SebMa

Update:

Maybe the solution is not needed anymore, check comments to this answer.

Original Answer

With pip versions above 20.03 you can use the old solver in order to get back all the available versions:

$ pip install  --use-deprecated=legacy-resolver pylibmc==
ERROR: Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement pylibmc== (from    
versions: 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.5.1, 0.5.2, 0.5.3, 0.5.4, 0.5.5, 0.6, 0.6.1,
0.7, 0.7.1, 0.7.2, 0.7.3, 0.7.4, 0.8, 0.8.1, 0.8.2, 0.9, 0.9.1, 0.9.2, 1.0a0, 
1.0b0, 1.0, 1.1, 1.1.1, 1.2.0, 1.2.1, 1.2.2, 1.2.3, 1.3.0, 1.4.0, 1.4.1, 
1.4.2, 1.4.3, 1.5.0, 1.5.1, 1.5.2, 1.5.100.dev0, 1.6.0, 1.6.1)

ERROR: No matching distribution found for pylibmc==
Answered By: Vincenzo Lavorini

Works with recent pip versions, no extra tools necessary:

pip install pylibmc== -v 2>/dev/null | awk '/Found link/ {print $NF}' | uniq
Answered By: Michel de Ruiter

This is Py3.9+ version of Limmy+EricChiang ‘s solution.

import json
import urllib.request
from distutils.version import StrictVersion


# print PyPI versions of package
def versions(package_name):
    url = "https://pypi.org/pypi/%s/json" % (package_name,)
    data = json.load(urllib.request.urlopen(url))
    versions = list(data["releases"])
    sortfunc = lambda x: StrictVersion(x.replace('rc', 'b').translate(str.maketrans('cdefghijklmn', 'bbbbbbbbbbbb')))
    versions.sort(key=sortfunc)
    return versions
Answered By: mirek

The pypi-version package does an excellent job:

$ pip3 install pip-versions

$ pip-versions latest rsyncy
0.0.4

$ pip-versions list rsyncy
0.0.1
0.0.2
0.0.3
0.0.4

And this even works behind a Nexus (sonatype) proxy!

Answered By: laktak

I usually run pip install packagename==somerandomstring. This returns error saying Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement packagename==somerandomstring and along with that error, pip will also list available versions on the server.

e.g.

$ pip install flask==aksjflashd
Collecting flask==aksjflashd
  Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement flask==aksjflashd 
(from versions: 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.3.1, 0.4, 0.5, 0.5.1, 0.5.2, 0.6, 0.6.1, 0.7, 0.7.1, 0.7.2, 0.8, 0.8.1, 0.9, 0.10, 0.10.1, 0.11, 0.11.1, 0.12, 0.12.1, 
0.12.2, 0.12.3, 0.12.4, 0.12.5, 1.0, 1.0.1, 1.0.2, 1.0.3, 1.0.4, 1.1.0, 1.1.1, 1.1.2)
No matching distribution found for flask==aksjflashd
$

You have to be extremely unlucky if the random string like ‘aksjflashd’ turns out to be actual package version!

Of course, you can use this trick with pip download too.

Answered By: Tejas Sarade
pypi-has() { set -o pipefail; curl -sfL https://pypi.org/pypi/$1/json | jq -e --arg v $2 'any( .releases | keys[]; . == $v )'; }

Usage:

$ pypi-has django 4.0x ; echo $?
false
1

$ pypi-has djangos 4.0x ; echo $?
22

$ pypi-has djangos 4.0 ; echo $?
22

$ pypi-has django 4.0 ; echo $?
true
0
Answered By: expelledboy

Providing a programmatic approach to Chris’s answer using pip install <package_name>==

import re
import subprocess
from packaging.version import VERSION_PATTERN as _VRESION_PATTERN

VERSION_PATTERN = re.compile(_VRESION_PATTERN , re.VERBOSE | re.IGNORECASE)


def get_available_versions(package_name):
    process = subprocess.run(['pip', 'install', f'{package_name}=='], stdout=subprocess.DEVNULL, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
    versions = []
    for line in process.stderr.decode('utf-8').splitlines():
        if 'Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement' in line:
            for match in VERSION_PATTERN.finditer(line.split('from versions:')[1]):
                versions.append(match.group(0))
    return versions

It can be used like

>>> get_available_versions('tensorflow')
['2.2.0rc1', '2.2.0rc2', '2.2.0rc3', '2.2.0rc4', '2.2.0', '2.2.1', '2.2.2', '2.2.3', '2.3.0rc0', '2.3.0rc1', '2.3.0rc2', '2.3.0', '2.3.1', '2.3.2', '2.3.3', '2.3.4', '2.4.0rc0', '2.4.0rc1', '2.4.0rc2', '2.4.0rc3', '2.4.0rc4', '2.4.0', '2.4.1', '2.4.2', '2.4.3', '2.4.4', '2.5.0rc0', '2.5.0rc1', '2.5.0rc2', '2.5.0rc3', '2.5.0', '2.5.1', '2.5.2', '2.5.3', '2.6.0rc0', '2.6.0rc1', '2.6.0rc2', '2.6.0', '2.6.1', '2.6.2', '2.6.3', '2.7.0rc0', '2.7.0rc1', '2.7.0', '2.7.1', '2.8.0rc0', '2.8.0rc1', '2.8.0']

and return a list of versions.

Note: it seems to provide compatible releases rather than all releases. To get full list, use json approach from Eric.

Answered By: Zhengyi Peng

To fetch the latest version for a GitLab private package, the below works.

pip index versions package-name --index-url https://<personal_access_token_name>:<personal_access_token>@gitlab.com/api/v4/projects/<project-id>/packages/pypi/simple/ | grep  'LATEST:' | sed -E 's/LATEST:| //g'
Answered By: user2661738
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